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About Us

The Dry Stone Wall Maze is a partnership project between:

  • Mark Ellis, who conceived the idea for and designed the maze, which is being built by him and other local craftsmen;
  • Friends of Dalby Forest who provide volunteer time to help on site and raise funds;

Forestry Commission, who provide the land and specialist expertise to this project.

 

Mark Ellis is a specialist dry stone waller DryStone.Me.UK who started his business in 1994 from his Farndale base in the heart of the beautiful North Yorkshire Moors. Over the years along with rebuilding traditional dry stone walls, Mark has also been commissioned by his clients to design and build bespoke stone wall garden landscapes.

 

The Friends of Dalby Forest (Registered Charity Number 1125882) is a group of volunteers who meet regularly in Dalby Forest (North Yorkshire, UK) to enhance the facilities and settings for all visitors, on a wide range of Forestry Commission-approved projects (www.friendsofdalbyforest.org.uk).

The Forestry Commission leads the development and promotion of sustainable forest management on behalf of the administrations in Scotland and England. Their mission is to protect and expand forests and woodlands and increase their value to society and the environment.

 

Mark first had the idea to build a dry stone wall maze in 1997, and with the help of Ryedale District Council, The Forestry Commission / Dalby Forest and The Friends of Dalby Forest, the first foundation stones were laid in September 2014. Building work has now begun on the first wall of what will be the largest dry stone wall construction in the world.

The Dry Stone Wall Maze will consist of over 4000 tonnes of locally sourced, reclaimed stone and will take Mark and his team of dry stone wallers approximately 3 years to complete. To keep track of the progress of this truly monumental dry stone landmark that is now being built in North Yorkshire, Dalby Forest, visit our website drystonewallmaze.com and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Flickr